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Note:  Do not rely on this information. It is very old.

Fabius Quintus Maximus Verrucosus

Fabius, Quintus (Maximus Verrucosus), surnamed 'Cunctator," great-great-grandson of the foregoing, and the most illustrions of his race, became consul in 233 B.C.. when he triumphed over the Ligurians. After the capture of Saguntum he was at the head of the memorable embassy to Carthage. In 217. when the Carthaginian victory at Thrasymene jeopardised the existence of Rome he was named dictator or (according to one reading in Livy) prodictator, and by his temporising strategy wore out at last the vigour of Hannibal till the re-conquest of Tarentum turned the tide of war. After five consulships he handed over his power to a worthy successor. Scipio Africanus, and died in 203 B.C having nearly attained his hundredth year.

“Whatever we find lovely in a friend, or in a saint, ought to elevate our affections: we should conclude that if there is so much sweetness in a drop; there must be infinitely more in the fountain. If there is so much splendour in a ray, what must the sun be in its glory!”
–Henry Scougal, The Life of God in the Soul of Man